My blog has been changed to make it more appealing for those who have New England ancestors and want to see the area through photos. Things I’ll include are typical white New England churches, libraries showing their genealogical collection, historical societies, cemeteries, war memorials, in general, anything to do with history.

For four years I’ve blogged mostly about my personal genealogy in New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire), New York, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Wyoming, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. I still will, can’t forget my own roots.

Please check out the labels on the right side for articles. The header tabs at the top are a work in progress.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Listen My Children



The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere


by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
1807-1882


Written April 19, 1860; first published in 1863 as part of "Tales of a Wayside Inn"

Photo of the Battle Road Trail in the
Minute Man National Historical Park
(Lexington, Lincoln, Concord)

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, "If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,--
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm."

Then he said "Good-night!" and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,--
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel's tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, "All is well!"
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,--
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse's side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry's height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer's dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,---
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.



Paul Revere's Capture Site in Lincoln, Massachusetts on the 19th of April, 1775





Paul Revere's Capture Site
Lincoln, Massachusetts on the 19th of April, 1775


AT THIS POINT,
ON THE OLD CONCORD ROAD AS IT THEN WAS,
ENDED THE MIDNIGHT RIDE OF
PAUL REVERE.

HE HAD, AT ABOUT TWO O’CLOCK OF THE MORNING
OF APRIL 19, 1775, THE NIGHT BEING CLEAR AND THE
MOON IN ITS THIRD QUARTER, GOT THIS FAR ON HIS
WAY FROM LEXINGTON TO CONCORD, ALARMING THE
INHABITANTS AS HE WENT, WHEN HE AND HIS
COMPANIONS, WILLIAM DAWES, OF BOSTON, AND DR.
SAMUEL PRESCOTT, OF CONCORD, WERE SUDDENLY
HALTED BY A BRITISH PATROL, WHO HAD STATIONED
THEMSELVES AT THIS BEND OF THE ROAD. DAWES,
TURNING BACK, MADE HIS ESCAPE. PRESCOTT,
CLEARNING THE STONE WALL, AND FOLLOWING A PATH
KNOWN TO HIM THROUGH THE LOW GROUND, REGAINED
THE HIGHWAY AT A POINT FURTHER ON, AND GAVE THE
ALARM AT CONCORD. REVERE TRIED TO REACH THE
NEIGHBORING WOOD, BUT WAS INTERCEPTED BY
A PARTY OF OFFICERS ACCOMPANYING THE PATROL,
DETAINED AND KEPT IN ARREST. PRESENTLY
HE WAS CARRIED BY THE PATROL BACK
TO LEXINGTON. THERE RELEASED, AND THAT
MORNING JOINED HANCOCK AND ADAMS.

THREE MEN OF LEXINGTON, SANDERSON,
BROWN AND LORING, STOPPED AT AN EARLIER
HOUR OF THE NIGHT BY THE SAME PATROL,
WERE ALSO TAKEN BACK WITH REVERE.

Friday, April 18, 2014

The Paul Revere Lantern


One of my favorite museums is the Concord Museum in Concord, Massachusetts. There is a new exhibit beginning today, called, "The Shot Heard Around the World: April 19, 1775." I took the two photos last fall and planned on posting them today, an anniversary day of April 18, 1775.

From the Concord Museum's web page is the following:
"Late in the evening of April 18, 1775, Paul Revere got word that the British were about to set out on a raid of the Provincial Congress’ military supplies stockpiled in Concord. He ordered fellow Patriots to set two lighted lanterns in the 
belfry of Boston’s Christ Church (Old North Church). This prearranged signal was intended for the Patriot leaders across the Charles River in Charlestown and indicated the route of the British march. Since 1853, this lantern has been identified as one of the lanterns hung as a signal in the church belfry. The collector, Cummings Davis (1816-1896) acquired this lantern around 1853 with the history that it was “bought in 1782 by Captain Daniel Brown, of Concord, 
from the sexton of Christ Church in Boston, and affirmed by the said sexton at the time to have been one of the two lanterns flashed from the belfry of that church by order of Paul Revere on the evening of April 18, 1775.”

Monday, April 14, 2014

Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, MA -- How to locate Records from Home or in Person

Researching for a tombstone at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA couldn't be easier, no matter if you do it from home or in person, even with 97,000 people buried there. The instructions on how to do it from home are after the first section of photos in which I show you how to do it in person.

A little bit about the cemetery, information from a flyer. "Today Mount Auburn's 175 acres are still recognized as one of the most significant designed landscapes in the country. The grounds are an internationally renowned arboretum and botanical garden, encompassing more than 9,400 trees and shrubs."


View of the Visitors Center from the main entrance. If you are looking for a site, this is where you would go first.
You enter the small room on the right.

Inside, there is one touch screen, with instructions. First thing you enter is the surname. All those with that name appear, and you select the given name. My example was Fairchild, then Joy (the father). My husband is holding the large map of the cemetery that was just printed out for me. On the lower left are the names of those buried in Lot 241.
Another detailed map shows the location where I need to search. Woodbine Path is in the upper middle, and with so many paths, I felt I needed the exact location, so we went to the office for help.
We were here on Saturday morning and was happy to find it open.
The helpful employee printed out a very detailed map with the exact location marked with the small green circle. In addition, she sent me a pdf to my email. This nice service had me wishing I had more family buried here.


My Rev. Joy H. Fairchild tombstone is shown above and since this is a hilly area, you need to walk, of course when my person was buried in 1859, that is what you had to do. Unfortunately, it was almost impossible to read the inscription. His family of 7 others were buried here, but this was the only marker. He was the father-in-law to Anthony Ten Eyck, I recently wrote about Anthony and his Hawaiian Connection, see HERE.

Huge tree greets you as you enter through the main gate.


Lovely stained glass photo taken from the restroom.

How to search from home

Below is the website to Mount Auburn along with their instructions.

http://mountauburn.org/2011/location-of-burial/
and additional information: http://mountauburn.org/2011/research-requests/

To start your search, you must complete both the name field and provide a range of dates for the burial in the form below.  Click the "Search" button, to see a list of all matching records from our database.  To see the burial location for anyone in the resulting list, simply click on the appropriate record and the location will appear on our map.

A Few Tips:
+  To narrow your search, please type in as much of the name as possible, for example "John James Smith" rather than just "J Smith."

+  Providing a range of dates for burial can either expand or narrow your search results.  If you are unsure when the burial might have taken place, you can always search our records from 1831 to the present.  If you know the approximate date of burial, limiting your search to a few years or even a decade will narrow the results.

+  If you are looking for all individuals buried at the Cemetery with a specific surname, simply type the last name into the form and search all records from 1831 to the present.

(Below is what I filled out at home.) The list of Fairchilds buried there are below.)
  • CARRIE FAIRCHILD
    Interred 7/29/1882
  • FLORINA F. FAIRCHILD
    Interred 4/15/1853
  • JOY H. FAIRCHILD
    Interred 2/24/1859
  • LENNIE JOY FAIRCHILD
    Interred 11/16/1868
  • MARY B. FAIRCHILD
    Interred 1/18/1864
  • MARY JOY FAIRCHILD
    Interred 7/20/1843
  • SENECA CREGEAN FAIRCHILD
    Interred 8/5/1863

Friday, April 11, 2014

I finally saw The Westford Knight

Update: I finally saw The Westford Knight last year, and my photos are below, thanks to a post today by Dick Eastman about this. His post reminded me that I hadn't posted my photos yet. My original post on this was in November 2009.
PRINCE HENRY, FIRST SINCLAIR OF ORKNEY,
BORN IN SCOTLAND, MADE A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY
TO NORTH AMERICA IN 1398. AFTER WINTERING
IN NOVA SCOTIA HE SAILED TO MASSACHUSETTS,
AND ON AN INLAND EXPEDITION IN 1399
TO PROSPECT HILL TO VIEW THE SURROUNDING
COUNTRYSIDE, ONE OF THE PARTY DIED. THE
PUNCH-HOLE ARMORIAL EFFIGY, WHICH ADORNS
THIS LEDGE IS A MEMORIAL TO THIS KNIGHT.



Now why haven't I seen The Westford Knight?  Dick Eastman posted an article about it yesterday (Nov. 2009) in his Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, full article for Plus subscribers, see:http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2009/11/-the-westford-knight-1.html  There have been many newspaper articles and blog postings about it.

On April 11, 2014, Dick Eastman wrote another piece about the Westford Knight. See: http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2014/04/knights-in-shining-armor-in-the-1300s-in-massachusetts.html

Per The Westford Museum, "According to one account the first Europeans to reach Westford were part of an expedition led by Prince Henry Sinclair, of Scotland. This voyage would have reached the New World in about 1400 A.D. The "Westford Knight" would then be a grave marker for one of the expedition who died near-by. The carvings can be seen as a picture of the Knight, complete with sword."

Photo from Wikipedia.

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Ford from Connecticut -- Surname Saturday

A Bridge to the Past
Last week, I mentioned I had two different Ford lines, one from Massachusetts and one from Connecticut, New Haven to be exact. This is the one from Connecticut. I don't normally write much about the family, but what I do is run the register report from my public tree on RootsWeb and copy it to this post, then do some editing before publishing it.

This past week, Miriam J. Robbins of AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors blog fame wrote a nice piece for her Tuesday's Tip post called, "Ancestry.com's Surname Meanings and History." When she does her Surname Saturday, she goes to the Ancestry.com's Surname Meanings and History site for information on the surname she is working on. I found this link to work for me. http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts

I did the Ford surname, for each of the 3 years (1840, 1880 and 1920) that show the number of families for each particular year. I chose 1840, and you can see from the legend that Connecticut had between 56 and 166 Ford families.

Note: I am not sure why my map isn't showing correctly, because on my draft, it shows as perfect. Massachusetts and Connecticut had the most Fords in 1840, with between 167 to 331 families.

Ford Name Meaning

English: topographic name for someone who lived near a ford, Middle English, Old English ford, or a habitational name from one of the many places named with this word, such as Ford in Northumberland, Shropshire, and West Sussex, or Forde in Dorset.Irish: Anglicized form (quasi-translation) of various Gaelic names, for example Mac Giolla na Naomh ‘son of Gilla na Naomh’ (a personal name meaning ‘servant of the saints’), Mac Conshámha ‘son of Conshnámha’ (a personal name composed of the elements con ‘dog’ + snámh ‘to swim’), in all of which the final syllable was wrongly thought to be áth ‘ford’, and Ó Fuar(th)áin (see Foran).Jewish: Americanized form of one or more like-sounding Jewish surnames.Translation of German Fürth (see Furth)."


Generation No. 1

1.TIMOTHY FORD was born ABT 1617, and died 28 AUG 1684 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. He married ELIZA GORDY?. She died 25 JUL 1681 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
Children of TIMOTHY FORD and ELIZA GORDY? were:
+2  i.SAMUEL FORD was born ABT 1639 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 2 JUN 1712 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
3  ii.Mary FORD died BEF 10 DEC 1691. She married Peter RICE 29 OCT 1683 in Concord, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, son of RICHARD RICE and ELIZABETH w\o RICHARD RICE. He was born ABT 1652, and died 3 DEC 1721 in Simsbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut. She married Nathaniel THORPE 20 NOV 1662 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, son of William THORPE.
4  iii.Bethia FORD died 1687. She married Matthew BELLAMY 1671 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. He died BEF 1689.
5  iv.Elizabeth FORD died AFT 31 OCT 1726. She married Joshua CULVER 23 DEC 1672 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, son of Edward CULVER and Ann ELLIS. He was born 12 JAN 1642/3 in Dedham, Norfolk Co., Massachusetts, and died 23 APR 1713 in Wallingford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She married Eleazer PECK 31 OCT 1726 in Wallingford, New Haven Co., Connecticut, son of Henry PECK.
+6  v.Matthew FORD died 3 NOV 1694 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.



Generation No. 2

2.SAMUEL FORD (TIMOTHY FORD1) was born ABT 1639 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 2 JUN 1712 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. He married ELIZABETH HOPKINS 27 JAN 1673 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She was born ABT 1642 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died BEF 20 APR 1707.
Children of SAMUEL FORD and ELIZABETH HOPKINS were:
7  i.Mary FORD was born 11 SEP 1676 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 30 JUN 1712 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She married John THOMAS ABT 1705, son of John THOMAS and Lydia PARKER. He was born 4 MAR 1675/6 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 15 JUN 1747 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
+8  ii.ELIZABETH FORD was born 19 FEB 1679 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died BEF 12 NOV 1729.
9  iii.Samuel FORD was born 31 AUG 1683 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died BEF 20 APR 1707.
10  iv.Hannah FORD was born 16 SEP 1687 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died AFT 26 FEB 1715/6 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She married Peter PERKINS. He was born 18 MAY 1682 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 14 FEB 1738/9 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
6.Matthew FORD (TIMOTHY FORD1) died 3 NOV 1694 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. He married Mary BROOKS 12 JAN 1674 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, daughter of John BROOKS. She was born 5 SEP 1654 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 1711/2 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
Children of Matthew FORD and Mary BROOKS were:
11  i.Matthew FORD was born 31 OCT 1675 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 7 OCT 1751 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. He married Elizabeth BRADLEY ABT 1698. She was born 11 SEP 1678, and died 9 OCT 1751 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
12  ii.Mary FORD was born 9 AUG 1678 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
13  iii.John FORD was born 11 NOV 1680 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
14  iv.Mary FORD was born 1682 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
15  v.Mary FORD was born 9 AUG 1684 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 13 AUG 1760 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She married Ebenezer BLAKESLEE 5 DEC 1706 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, son of Ebenezer BLAKESLEE and Hannah LUPTON. He was born 4 FEB 1685/6 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 1761.
16  vi.Jonathan FORD was born 26 JAN 1686/7 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
17  vii.Daniel FORD was born ABT 24 MAR 1689/90 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 1711 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
18  viii.Benjamin FORD was born ABT 16 AUG 1691 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
19  ix.Ebenezer FORD was born ABT 16 AUG 1691 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 1724 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
20  x.Barnabas FORD was born ABT 9 DEC 1694 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.



Generation No. 3

8.ELIZABETH FORD (SAMUEL FORD2, TIMOTHY FORD1) was born 19 FEB 1679 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died BEF 12 NOV 1729. She married STEPHEN PERKINS 27 AUG 1700 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, son of JOHN PERKINS and MARY w\o JOHN PERKINS. He was born 7 APR 1680 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died AFT 1755 in Roundhill, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
Children of ELIZABETH FORD and STEPHEN PERKINS were:
21  i.Joseph PERKINS was born 18 SEP 1701 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 1776 in Wilkes, North Carolina. He married Phebe MOULTHROP 23 FEB 1727 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She was born 15 OCT 1711.
+22  ii.ELIZABETH PERKINS was born 10 NOV 1703 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 22 MAY 1760 in North Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
23  iii.Lydia PERKINS was born 24 NOV 1705 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 22 DEC 1767 in Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She married William WILMOT 23 DEC 1725 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
24  iv.Thankful PERKINS was born 17 APR 1708 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut, and died 23 DEC 1788 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
25  v.Mary PERKINS was born 31 MAR 1712 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. She married Daniel FORD 13 MAY 1736 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
26  vi.Stephen PERKINS was born 14 JUN 1716 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Anthony Ten Eyck and his Hawaiian Connection

Washington Place, taken by Cynthia Shenette, February 2014


Cynthia Shenette of Heritage Zen blog, asked if I had anything she wanted me to look up during her trip to Hawaii. After a few inquiries, I mentioned a request, and learned she would be in Honolulu and would indeed be visiting Washington Place, a Greek Revival palace a distant relative of mine, Anthony Ten Eyck named for George Washington. She took the above photo for me, and gave me some leads for information. I believe it was Heather Rojo, of the Nutfield Genealogy blog, who asked me many years ago, if I had Anthony Ten Eyck in my tree, because she had also gone to Washington Place and had seen his name. Commissioner Anthony Ten Eyck was my 5th cousin 4x removed. Because of the history, photo and my curiosity, I am posting this piece.


There is quite a bit of information on Washington Place, and below are parts of the official documentation about the naming of the Palace, thanks to Wikipedia, "One of the first boarders was Anthony Ten Eyck, an American Commissioner to the islands appointed by President James K. Polk who established the American Legation in the house. Ten Eyck named the house "Washington Place" in a February 22, 1848 letter, after George Washington in celebration of the first US president's birthday. King Kamehameha III officially approved the name." By the time this occurred, Anthony's wife had passed away in 1846. "It was where Queen Liliʻuokalani was arrested during the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom. Later it became the official residence of the Governor of Hawaiʻi. It is a National Historic Landmark, designated in 2007. The current governor's residence was built in 2008 behind the historic residence, and is located on the same grounds as Washington Place." The placing of the House as a National Historic Landmark document is 8 pages long,  and below are pages 2 and 6 with mention to Anthony TenEyck.
 "It is to Commissioner TenEyck that Washington Place owes its name"

From various resources, I've been able to do a short timeline of Anthony's career.

26 Feb 1811 born in Watertown, New York, son of Egert Ten Eyck, a judge, and Rebecca Pearce

1835-1841 Lawyer, later Clerk of Michigan Supreme Court in Detroit, Michigan

1841-1843 U.S. Commissioner to Sandwich Islands, Hawaii

Secretary James Buchanan on March 28, 1845 appointed Anthony Ten Eyck commissioner to Hawaii. US Diplomatic Representatives to Hawaii Commissioners from 1845 - 1848

1 Jun 1861–23 Sep 1865 Major and Paymaster Vol. In 1865 was mustered out of volunteer service.


5 Oct 1867-- Died in Guilford, New Haven Co., Connecticut and is buried at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Michigan.

Anthony and Harriet had two children, Egbert F. born about 1839 and Harriet Fairchild born about 1844. Information is nil on them. However, a reader and friend took photos of where his father and family were buried, photos were on my post almost two years ago.

I am missing quite a bit about this family, and I'm quite hesitate about posting this. But, perhaps by doing so, somebody will share the same line and maybe have more information, and hopefully share. A short Descendant Report, beginning with his parents is below.


Generation No. 1

1.Egbert TENEYCK (Antony TENEYCK6, Jacob C. TENEYCK5, Coenraet TENEYCK4, Jacob TENEYCK3, COENRAEDT TENEYCK2, WILHELM an DER EICK1) was born 18 APR 1779 in Schodack, Rensselaer Co., New York, and died 11 APR 1844 in Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York. He was buried in Brookside Cemetery, Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York. He married Rebecca PEARCE. She was born 15 AUG 1788, and died 26 FEB 1850 in Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York. She was buried in Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York. He married Ann PEARCE. She was born 8 DEC 1799, and died 8 JUN 1870. She was buried in Brookside Cemetery, Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York.
Children of Egbert TENEYCK and Rebecca PEARCE were:
+2  i.Anthony TENEYCK was born 26 FEB 1811 in Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, and died 2 NOV 1867 in Guilford, New Haven Co., Connecticut.
3  ii.Catherine TENEYCK was born 7 JAN 1813. She married Jabez H. \ Jacob FOSTER 24 MAY 1836.
+4  iii.Lydia Maria TENEYCK was born 7 MAY 1815 in New York, and died 14 OCT 1884 in Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York.
5  iv.Robert TENEYCK was born ABT 1832 in New York. He married Catharine GREENE.
6  v.Egbert TENEYCK was born ABT 1828 in New York, and died 5 APR 1878.


Generation No. 2

2.Anthony TENEYCK (Egbert TENEYCK7, Antony TENEYCK6, Jacob C. TENEYCK5, Coenraet TENEYCK4, Jacob TENEYCK3, COENRAEDT TENEYCK2, WILHELM an DER EICK1) was born 26 FEB 1811 in Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, and died 2 NOV 1867 in Guilford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. He was buried in Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan. He married Harriet Elizabeth FAIRCHILD 23 AUG 1836 in Albany, Albany Co., New York, daughter of Joy Hamlet FAIRCHILD and Cynthia WATEROUS \ WATERHOUSE. She was born 2 SEP 1815, and died 5 NOV 1846 in Sandwich Islands, Hawaii. He married Harriet B. JOHNSON 23 NOV 1851.
Children of Anthony TENEYCK and Harriet Elizabeth FAIRCHILD were:
7  i.Harriet Fairchild TENEYCK was born 1844.
8  ii.Egbert F. TENEYCK was born 1839, and died 1888.